Learning Centers

New Directions believes that the foundation of community is supporting each other and working together towards success. Learning Centers located within the community provide a place to build and foster residents' growth and skills, regardless of their age.

All on-site Learning Centers are equipped with computer labs, called Neighborhood Network Centers, that provide new technologies to the seniors, children, and their families.


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Youth Learning Centers

All young people have the potential to succeed in life and contribute to society. However, not all children get the support they need to thrive. New Directions celebrates the talents of children who live in housing communities and their surrounding neighborhoods with a positive youth development strategy.

In Louisville's Shelby Park, Newburg, California, Shawnee, and Portland neighborhoods, volunteers help community children with homework and enrichment studies. An emphasis is placed on homework completion, reading, creative activities, and an overall learning experience.

Neighborhood mentors and volunteers help kids complete homework every night.  Tens of thousands of hours of supervised study have already been accomplished, and summer programs ensure that our kids learn through field trips and daily study. Mentors are able to identify children at risk of academic failure, and solutions are positive, volunteer-enriched and proactive.  Youth Learning Centers bring academic mentorship to children where they need it most - at home. 

Public and private resources also enable New Directions to offer employment to residents through the Learning Center's Neighborhood Mentor staff position in Youth Services.


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Lifelong Learning Centers

Empowered adults and seniors find allies through New Directions Lifelong Learning Services at four Learning Centers located in both elderly and multifamily housing communities.  Lifelong Learning Services are specifically designed to attract young parents and older, disabled residents living in the Phoenix Hill, California, Limerick and Russell neighborhoods.

Residents teach each other computer skills in the safety of Neighborhood Network Labs located just a few steps from their apartments. This education generates employment opportunities, allows residents to stay up-to-date with on-line advancements of banks, retailers, and other businesses, and enables them to communicate using technology. 

By introducing online activities such as email, Facebook, and Skype, residents can be reconnected to faraway family members.  This communication reduces isolation, bridges intergenerational gaps, and enriches lives.